Conscious voting - have your say!

At our weekly group meditations we usually talk about living a more conscious, kind and loving life, about the subtleties of meditation and sometimes we dive into the fact that time doesn’t really exist. It’s not usual for us to be talking about policy and politics. But that doesn’t mean it’s not important.

I always say that knowledge is for action. Meditation is a practice to return to us to our natural state of ‘Being’. We then need to take this relaxed, expansive, creative and unified state of consciousness into the world and substantiate it. This is the action part.

So at last night’s group meditation I spoke with Vedic meditator and Policy Lawyer, Sarah O’Brien, on the upcoming Victorian election. The aim was to help those who may not be up to date on the current Australian/Victorian political regime, to give new voters (the youth are really speaking out in the USA now!) a lay of the land, and to assist those who may need some guidance in voting in this years state election.

We also wanted to create a space to talk openly about our current government, actively participating in democracy, the issues we’re facing, and how we can bring a conscious and informed awareness to the upcoming election.

We explored taking our ‘Being into action’, why we vote, having challenging or confronting conversations, not believing everything you read, and the importance of talking to those in our communities about our values and principles so we can co-create a better experience for all.

And then of course the question… “Who do I vote for on November 24th?” No definitive answer is given in this talk on ‘who’ but we definitely explore the ‘how’ and ‘why’. And we have created a list of resources below to help you out.

Big shout out to Sarah for her wisdom and passion on the subject and sharing it with us all! If you want to ask her any questions, please email obrien.sarahc@gmail.com (she loves talking about this stuff and can help you with any questions). Enjoy the talk!

 
 

resources and links

WHAT IS THE DIRECTION OF THIS ELECTION?

“I think the main thing is that law and order is going to be a massive part of this election. Both the government and the coalition are introducing policies that are ‘tough on crime’ but are at the expense of basic liberties and freedoms. They’re playing on the public perception that crime is a up when in actual fact it decreases every year.” Sarah O’Brien

Watch this video summarising the law and order aspect of the election.

Here’s a great article in the Guardian on how crime came to dominate the political conversation.

Another article summing up south Sudanese experiences because of racially motivated reporting.

This is an article from the legal professions as a call to parties, or a statement on what they want to see from the parties in the election.

Articles on current and proposed policy within government.

Mandatory sentencing that is now a law as part of the Andrew’s Labour Government.

This is a good write up on why mandatory sentencing doesn’t work.

The policy on ‘unlawful association’ - not a law yet but the government tried very hard to make it one before the election.

Current policy on bail and remand.

The opposition is planning on reintroducing compulsory religious education (Christian) into public schools across Victoria and scrapping the safe schools program.

Who do I vote for? We SUGGEST CheckING out the websites of the parties and their policies. LOOK AT THEIR IDEOLOGY AND POLICies AND See WHAT RESONATES WITH YOU. DO YOUR RESEARCH! IT ONLY TAKES A SMALL AMOUNT OF TIME.

Greens

Labour (current government in Victoria) - ‘Delivering for all Victorians’

Liberal - ‘Get Back in Control’

Reason Party by Fiona Patten

Victorian National Party

Victorian Socialists

You can also find out what each candidate in each electorate is all about so you can make an informed decision when you vote. You’ll also be able to see which party is predicted to win your electorate based on past voting.

Don’t know what electorate you’re in? Find out here!

If you want to make it fun, engage in a media outlet that makes it enjoyable for you like The Project or Pedestrian TV. Or head to The Guardian.

If you don’t have time to do all the research, you can also refer to the ‘how to vote cards’ handed out by your preferred party on the day of the election.

Laura Poole